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CRAFTSMANSHIP
The Artistry of Bhadohi
Mirzapur and Bhadohi district are the oldest hub
of carpet-weaving in India. It makes up 60 percent
of the sub-continents rug-making industry.
Carpets are not woven in factories, rather in the comfort of the weavers home. From our headquarters in Mirzapur, our production officers visit each loom, at least once every fortnight. The looms are spread over 100,000 sq. km., stretching across 7 villages.

 

 

Obeetee - CRAFTSMANSHIP
a 500 year old craft

Akbar's master craftsmen at your service

The tradition of carpet-weaving came here as far back as the 16th century during the reign of the Mughal Emperor, Akbar.

Artisans that travelled down from Persia via the Grand Trunk Road brought with them the intricate art of hand-knotting carpets and passed their skills down to the craftsman here.

Over the past 5 centuries, the artisans of Bhadohi have watched their fathers weave, and then apprenticed to become gifted weavers themselves. The tradition of carpet-weaving here, is truly in their blood.

 

TECHNIQUES
Our craftsmen use the following
weaving techniques to make
carpets for life —

1

Hand Knotting

This technique has changed very little since it was introduced by the Mughals. It involves using a special loom, where the warp is set as the base of the carpet and the design is taken across the weft using coloured threads, determined by the design. This type of weaving is characterised by the likeness of the design at the back as it is on the face of the carpet. The quality of a hand-knotted carpet is determined by the number of knots per square inch — a higher density indicates a superior piece. A hand-knotted rug will almost always have fringes because there is no binding on the ends of the carpet. They have a flatter pile with less texture.

 

2

Flat Weaving

Created by interlacing warp (vertical) and weft (horizontal) threads. The threads are woven on a loom into colourful patterns, without the pile or backing you would find on knotted or tufted rugs. Flat weaves tend to be lighter and more flexible. They are easier to manage, fold, or move and are reversible — since the pattern is the same on both sides of the rug.

 

3

Hand Tufting

A hand-tufted rug is made by punching strands of wool using a hand-operated tool into a canvas that is stretched on a frame

 

4

Hand Screening

Obeetee is the first in the industry to have successfully introduced the hand screen printing technique on 100% wool carpets. A screen, engraved with the design, is used to transfer the colour onto a carpet. The largest hand-screen carpet printed by Obeetee is 5ft x 60 ft.

 
Stories from our Looms

Urmila

Weaver & mother of four

“My favourite thing to do at work is singing out loud and laughing at silly jokes with the other women here, who started out as co-workers but have now become sisters.”
For women in rural India, it is unconventional to work and earn for the household. However, Urmila took the opportunity to participate in Obeetee’s Women Weavers Initiative, where she was trained for three months and taught how to weave the perfect carpet. She now works from 8 am to 5 pm that provides additional income for her family — who are very proud of the work she does. She enjoys singing and sharing a joke or two while she is weaving. For Urmila, her co-workers have now become sisters.

Lalmani Maurya

Weaving Supervisor

“Spending time with my loved ones is on the top of my list. And the flexible work structure at Obeetee has always helped me prioritise my family.”

He has been working with Obeetee, for 35 years. Lalmani is a second-generation weaver - his skills were passed onto him by his father. He is trained in weaving modern and traditional designs and has worked on several PTBI carpets. On turning 60, he became a supervisor. He grows vegetables on his farm, has a soft corner for cows and can always be spotted in his kurta pyjama.

Bhonu

Weaver

“My family has been associated with the company for three generations and I am proud that I have been able to meet people from so many countries. My most memorable moment was when I was interviewed and featured in a documentary film”

Bhonu still remembers how he was taught the intricacies of carpet-making by his father. Now a great-grandfather, his five sons, and one grandson are also involved in the craft and are commissioned to work by Obeetee. He loves to work with bright colours and traditional motifs of Persian carpets.

Mahendra Yadav

Binder

“If everyone weaves, who will do the other things? Carpet making has other steps too, you know!”

He has been working with carpets for 37 years. Mahendra comes from a family of weavers but he chose binding over weaving. He says that if everyone is involved in weaving who would finish the carpet. He is a foodie and enjoys watching crime and suspense-themed shows. He works in the looms throughout the day and helps his daughters with household chores in the evening. He loves hearing music and believes that music can teach you many things.

Shyamdhar Yadav

Carver

“The company was experimenting with finishing techniques, and when I tried it, everyone there loved my work and from that moment, I began my lifelong journey at Obeetee. If someone asked me about the one thing that I could change about my journey with Obeetee, I’d say I wouldn’t have it any other way”

Shyamdhar started learning how to weave carpets at the age of 15, but now at 53, he finds singeing and carving more appealing. He believes that the finishing process makes all the difference.

Ramlal Mula

Weaver

He has been working with Obeetee for 46 years. Ramlal is fondly called Ramlal Mula as he belongs to the Mulapur Village. The first carpet that he had woven was the Kaithey pattern, a Moroccon design. Now he enjoys weaving contemporary patterns, some of which are very challenging. Even though he has 30 weavers as a part of his team, he prefers to set the swatch for any new design himself.

click on the grid
to knot

300

A single Bhadohi carpet can boast up to 300 knots per sq. inch.
That’s right, 300!

And every craftsman ties between six to nine thousand knots a day.
The obeetee factory
Art & Science of Carpet making
Obeetee -  The obeetee factory
Obeetee -  The obeetee factory

Our factory is a vast expanse of craft-driven, innovation supported processes.

Obeetee -  The obeetee factory
Obeetee -  The obeetee factory
Obeetee -  The obeetee factory
Obeetee -  The obeetee factory
Obeetee -  The obeetee factory
Obeetee - The obeetee factory
Obeetee -  The obeetee factory
Obeetee -  The obeetee factory
Obeetee -  The obeetee factory
STEPS IN CARPET MAKING
  1. Inspiration

    The process begins by building the story of each collection. This is created in conjunction with trend forecasts, colour schemes, and thematic explorations.

  2. Design
  3. Colour
  4. Lab Testing
  5. Dyeing
  6. Naksha
  7. Preparing the loom
  8. Weaving
  9. Washing
  10. Offlooming &
    preparing for Bazaar
  11. Inspection
  12. Final Approval
 
AN EXTENSION OF OUR CRAFT

1

Manor & Mews
In 2015, Obeetee partnered with London’s leading bespoke furniture-maker David Salmon to create Manor and Mews. Based in Jaipur, the company is an amalgamation of Obeetee’s interest to expand into furniture making and David’s expression of a fresh look that counterbalances his traditional work. Their team of designers and cabinetmakers fuse fabric from Obeetee with the furniture, to create a starkly distinctive narrative. Products from the company are supplied around the world and domestically to companies like Fab India.

2

Panipat Factory
The Obeetee unit in Panipat, focuses primarily on sustainablity and products made of sustainable and natural materials such as cotton, wool, jute, hemp, linen, yarns made by recycling PET bottles. The product line also includes pillows made using undyed yarns
 

When you buy an Obeetee Carpet, you buy a piece of history, and participate in a 500 year old tradition.

SHOP OUR CARPETS

CRAFTSMANSHIP

The Artistry of Bhadohi

Mirzapur and Bhadohi district are the oldest hub of carpet-weaving in India. It makes up 60 percent of the sub-continents rug-making industry.

Carpets are not woven in factories, rather in the comfort of the weavers home. From our headquarters in Mirzapur, our production officers visit each loom, at least once every fortnight. The looms are spread over 100,000 sq. km., stretching across 7 villages.

 

a 500 year old craft

Akbar's master craftsmen at your service

Akbar's master craftsmen
at your service

The tradition of carpet-weaving came here as far back as the 16th century during the reign of the Mughal Emperor, Akbar.

Artisans that travelled down from Persia via the Grand Trunk Road brought with them the intricate art of hand-knotting carpets and passed their skills down to the craftsman here.

Over the past 5 centuries, the artisans of Bhadohi have watched their fathers weave, and then apprenticed to become gifted weavers themselves. The tradition of carpet-weaving here, is truly in their blood.

 
A little game for you
click on the intersections
to knot
click on the
intersections to knot

300

A single Bhadohi carpet
can boast up to 300
knots
per sq. inch.
 

300

A single Bhadohi carpet can boast up to 300 knots per sq. inch. That’s right, 300!

And every craftsman ties between six to nine thousand knots a day.
 
TECHNIQUES
Our craftsmen use the following weaving techniques to make carpets for life —
Our craftsmen use the following weaving techniques to make
carpets for life —

1

Hand Knotting

This technique has changed very little since it was introduced by the Mughals. It involves using a special loom, where the warp is set as the base of the carpet and the design is taken across the weft using coloured threads, determined by the design. This type of weaving is characterised by the likeness of the design at the back as it is on the face of the carpet. The quality of a hand-knotted carpet is determined by the number of knots per square inch — a higher density indicates a superior piece. A hand-knotted rug will almost always have fringes because there is no binding on the ends of the carpet. They have a flatter pile with less texture.

1
Hand Knotting
This technique has changed very little since it was introduced by the Mughals. It involves using a special loom, where the warp is set as the base of the carpet and the design is taken across the weft using coloured threads, determined by the design. This type of weaving is characterised by the likeness of the design at the back as it is on the face of the carpet. The quality of a hand-knotted carpet is determined by the number of knots per square inch — a higher density indicates a superior piece. A hand-knotted rug will almost always have fringes because there is no binding on the ends of the carpet. They have a flatter pile with less texture.
 

2

Flat Weaves

Created by interlacing warp (vertical) and weft (horizontal) threads. The threads are woven on a loom into colourful patterns, without the pile or backing you would find on knotted or tufted rugs. Flat weaves tend to be lighter and more flexible. They are easier to manage, fold, or move and are reversible — since the pattern is the same on both sides of the rug.

2
Flat Weaves
Created by interlacing warp (vertical) and weft (horizontal) threads. The threads are woven on a loom into colourful patterns, without the pile or backing you would find on knotted or tufted rugs. Flat weaves tend to be lighter and more flexible. They are easier to manage, fold, or move and are reversible — since the pattern is the same on both sides of the rug.
 

3

Hand Tufting

A hand-tufted rug is made by punching strands of wool using a hand-operated tool into a canvas that is stretched on a frame

3
Hand Tufting
A hand-tufted rug is made by punching strands of wool using a hand-operated tool into a canvas that is stretched on a frame
 

4

Hand screening

Obeetee is the first in the industry to have successfully introduced the hand screen printing technique on 100% wool carpets. A screen, engraved with the design, is used to transfer the colour onto a carpet. The largest hand-screen carpet printed by Obeetee is 5ft x 60 ft.

4
Hand screening
Obeetee is the first in the industry to have successfully introduced the hand screen printing technique on 100% wool carpets. A screen, engraved with the design, is used to transfer the colour onto a carpet. The largest hand-screen carpet printed by Obeetee is 5ft x 60 ft.
 
Stories from our Looms
Stories from our Looms

Urmila

Weaver & mother of four

“My favourite thing to do at work is singing out loud and laughing at silly jokes with the other women here, who started out as co-workers but have now become sisters.”
For women in rural India, it is unconventional to work and earn for the household. However, Urmila took the opportunity to participate in Obeetee’s Women Weavers Initiative, where she was trained for three months and taught how to weave the perfect carpet. She now works from 8 am to 5 pm that provides additional income for her family — who are very proud of the work she does. She enjoys singing and sharing a joke or two while she is weaving. For Urmila, her co-workers have now become sisters.

Urmila

Weaver & mother
of four

“My favourite thing to do at work is singing out loud and laughing at silly jokes with the other women here, who started out as co-workers but have now become sisters.”
For women in rural India, it is unconventional to work and earn for the household. However, Urmila took the opportunity to participate in Obeetee’s Women Weavers Initiative, where she was trained for three months and taught how to weave the perfect carpet. She now works from 8 am to 5 pm that provides additional income for her family — who are very proud of the work she does. She enjoys singing and sharing a joke or two while she is weaving. For Urmila, her co-workers have now become sisters.

Lalmani Maurya

Weaving Supervisor

“Spending time with my loved ones is on the top of my list. And the flexible work structure at Obeetee has always helped me prioritise my family.”

He has been working with Obeetee, for 35 years. Lalmani is a second-generation weaver - his skills were passed onto him by his father. He is trained in weaving modern and traditional designs and has worked on several PTBI carpets. On turning 60, he became a supervisor. He grows vegetables on his farm, has a soft corner for cows and can always be spotted in his kurta pyjama.

Lalmani Maurya

Weaving Supervisor

“Spending time with my loved ones is on the top of my list. And the flexible work structure at Obeetee has always helped me prioritise my family.”

He has been working with Obeetee, for 35 years. Lalmani is a second-generation weaver - his skills were passed onto him by his father. He is trained in weaving modern and traditional designs and has worked on several PTBI carpets. On turning 60, he became a supervisor. He grows vegetables on his farm, has a soft corner for cows and can always be spotted in his kurta pyjama.

Bhonu

Weaver

“My family has been associated with the company for three generations and I am proud that I have been able to meet people from so many countries. My most memorable moment was when I was interviewed and featured in a documentary film”
Bhonu still remembers how he was taught the intricacies of carpet-making by his father. Now a great-grandfather, his five sons, and one grandson are also involved in the craft and are commissioned to work by Obeetee. He loves to work with bright colours and traditional motifs of Persian carpets.

Bhonu

Weaver

“My family has been associated with the company for three generations and I am proud that I have been able to meet people from so many countries. My most memorable moment was when I was interviewed and featured in a documentary film”
Bhonu still remembers how he was taught the intricacies of carpet-making by his father. Now a great-grandfather, his five sons, and one grandson are also involved in the craft and are commissioned to work by Obeetee. He loves to work with bright colours and traditional motifs of Persian carpets.

Mahendra Yadav

Binder

“If everyone weaves, who will do the other things? Carpet making has other steps too, you know!”

He has been working with carpets for 37 years. Mahendra comes from a family of weavers but he chose binding over weaving. He says that if everyone is involved in weaving who would finish the carpet. He is a foodie and enjoys watching crime and suspense-themed shows. He works in the looms throughout the day and helps his daughters with household chores in the evening. He loves hearing music and believes that music can teach you many things.

Mahendra Yadav

Binder

“If everyone weaves, who will do the other things? Carpet making has other steps too, you know!”

He has been working with carpets for 37 years. Mahendra comes from a family of weavers but he chose binding over weaving. He says that if everyone is involved in weaving who would finish the carpet. He is a foodie and enjoys watching crime and suspense-themed shows. He works in the looms throughout the day and helps his daughters with household chores in the evening. He loves hearing music and believes that music can teach you many things.

Shyamdhar Yadav

Carver

“The company was experimenting with finishing techniques, and when I tried it, everyone there loved my work and from that moment, I began my lifelong journey at Obeetee. If someone asked me about the one thing that I could change about my journey with Obeetee, I’d say I wouldn’t have it any other way”

Shyamdhar started learning how to weave carpets at the age of 15, but now at 53, he finds singeing and carving more appealing. He believes that the finishing process makes all the difference.

Shyamdhar Yadav

Carver

“The company was experimenting with finishing techniques, and when I tried it, everyone there loved my work and from that moment, I began my lifelong journey at Obeetee. If someone asked me about the one thing that I could change about my journey with Obeetee, I’d say I wouldn’t have it any other way”

Shyamdhar started learning how to weave carpets at the age of 15, but now at 53, he finds singeing and carving more appealing. He believes that the finishing process makes all the difference.

Ramlal Mula

Weaver

He has been working with Obeetee for 46 years. Ramlal is fondly called Ramlal Mula as he belongs to the Mulapur Village. The first carpet that he had woven was the Kaithey pattern, a Moroccon design. Now he enjoys weaving contemporary patterns, some of which are very challenging. Even though he has 30 weavers as a part of his team, he prefers to set the swatch for any new design himself.

Ramlal Mula

Weaver

He has been working with Obeetee for 46 years. Ramlal is fondly called Ramlal Mula as he belongs to the Mulapur Village. The first carpet that he had woven was the Kaithey pattern, a Moroccon design. Now he enjoys weaving contemporary patterns, some of which are very challenging. Even though he has 30 weavers as a part of his team, he prefers to set the swatch for any new design himself.

The obeetee factory
Art & Science of Carpet making
Obeetee -  The obeetee factory
Obeetee -  The obeetee factory

Our factory is a vast expanse of craft-driven, innovation supported processes.

Obeetee -  The obeetee factory
Obeetee -  The obeetee factory
Obeetee -  The obeetee factory
Obeetee -  The obeetee factory
Obeetee -  The obeetee factory
Obeetee - The obeetee factory
Obeetee -  The obeetee factory
Obeetee -  The obeetee factory
Obeetee -  The obeetee factory
Obeetee -  The obeetee factory
Obeetee -  The obeetee factory

Our factory is a vast expanse of craft-driven, innovation supported processes.

Obeetee -  The obeetee factory
Obeetee -  The obeetee factory
Obeetee -  The obeetee factory
Obeetee -  The obeetee factory
Obeetee -  The obeetee factory
Obeetee - The obeetee factory
Obeetee -  The obeetee factory
Obeetee -  The obeetee factory
Obeetee -  The obeetee factory

Steps IN CARPET MAKING

The process begins by building the story of each collection. This is created in conjunction with trend forecasts, colour schemes, and thematic explorations.

The process begins by building the story of each collection. This is created in conjunction with trend forecasts, colour schemes, and thematic explorations.

Our design department, which is the backbone of our rug creation process, has an intimate understanding of the weaving medium and knowledge of contemporary art and design. Combining fresh perspectives on traditional crafts with state-of-the-art design technology, they push the boundaries of colour, texture and pattern to make authentic designs and visual masterpieces.

Our design department, which is the backbone of our rug creation process, has an intimate understanding of the weaving medium and knowledge of contemporary art and design. Combining fresh perspectives on traditional crafts with state-of-the-art design technology, they push the boundaries of colour, texture and pattern to make authentic designs and visual masterpieces.

Based on the naksha created, our team of experts makes the colours from an array of pigments to match the design. We have the capabilities to customise colours of up to 100 shades of the same hue. Our research will allow us to add more colour pigments.

At Obeetee, enormous effort goes into getting the quality right. There are several tests at every stage of the process – from testing the raw material to matching and standardising the colours.

At Obeetee, enormous effort goes into getting the quality right. There are several tests at every stage of the process – from testing the raw material to matching and standardising the colours.

Different types of fibres need different methods of dyeing. There are over 1000 machines of different capacities. The dyeing procedures are followed carefully and in an eco-friendly manner, keeping in mind social accountability.

Different types of fibres need different methods of dyeing. There are over 1000 machines of different capacities. The dyeing procedures are followed carefully and in an eco-friendly manner, keeping in mind social accountability.

The naksha serves as the masterplan for a carpet. Although they were previously painted by hand, these are now rendered using state-of-the-art CAD systems. This allows our design department to share colour samples and renderings in real-time with clients around the world.

The naksha serves as the masterplan for a carpet. Although they were previously painted by hand, these are now rendered using state-of-the-art CAD systems. This allows our design department to share colour samples and renderings in real-time with clients around the world.

The loom is the foundation of the carpet. The weavers prepare the loom with the predetermined number of warps (taana) for the loom through which the yarns would be woven. Our authorities make sure that the correct yarn tufts, nakshas, and material are supplied to the weavers. The wefts (bana) are systematically hung in a ball (kabli) before they start the daily work (dehadi).

Tools used at the loom:
Gucchi - poms
Gucchai – for straightening the entangled knots

The loom is the foundation of the carpet. The weavers prepare the loom with the predetermined number of warps (taana) for the loom through which the yarns would be woven. Our authorities make sure that the correct yarn tufts, nakshas, and material are supplied to the weavers. The wefts (bana) are systematically hung in a ball (kabli) before they start the daily work (dehadi).

Tools used at the loom:
Gucchi - poms
Gucchai – for straightening the entangled knots

Weaving is a highly skilled process where some weavers can tie up to 9000 knots tied in a day, and some carpets take up to a year to be completely woven. Tools used: chura is a metal blade, forged to cut the knots evenly without damaging the yarn Image: Weaver through the loom is looking at the naksha. Craftsmanship with skill — envisioning design from paper to loom

Image: Pushing the knots down - After knotting and forming the pattern, a fork-shaped tool called Punja is used to press and adjust the wefts after every row is woven. The weaver ensures that the density of the carpet is achieved as per the intricacy of its design.

Image: Back of the carpet - While weaving, the true design of the carpet is not visible and can only be ascertained by the back of a carpet.

Weaving is a highly skilled process where some weavers can tie up to 9000 knots tied in a day, and some carpets take up to a year to be completely woven. Tools used: chura is a metal blade, forged to cut the knots evenly without damaging the yarn Image: Weaver through the loom is looking at the naksha. Craftsmanship with skill — envisioning design from paper to loom

Image: Pushing the knots down - After knotting and forming the pattern, a fork-shaped tool called Punja is used to press and adjust the wefts after every row is woven. The weaver ensures that the density of the carpet is achieved as per the intricacy of its design.

Image: Back of the carpet - While weaving, the true design of the carpet is not visible and can only be ascertained by the back of a carpet.

The washing processes define the final look and feel of the carpet. It cleans off foreign particles and gives the carpet a soft lustre. This also prevents shrinkage and shredding. There are several finishes that are exclusive to Obeetee.

The washing processes define the final look and feel of the carpet. It cleans off foreign particles and gives the carpet a soft lustre. This also prevents shrinkage and shredding. There are several finishes that are exclusive to Obeetee.

After the carpet is woven there are a set of processes and treatments that reveal the finished piece.

Tanai is the process of stretching the rug and giving it shape.

Carving - Gul tarashna - to achieve clarity in design and achieve the pile height. Each rug is meticulously carved under the supervision of obeetee inspectors. The carvers follow the design palette to achieve the desired result.

Edge Binding - Pechai - Carpets are bound with wool and silk on their sides for stability and longevity. The number of stitches is determined by the intricacy and density of the carpet

After the carpet is woven there are a set of processes and treatments that reveal the finished piece.

Tanai is the process of stretching the rug and giving it shape.

Carving - Gul tarashna - to achieve clarity in design and achieve the pile height. Each rug is meticulously carved under the supervision of obeetee inspectors. The carvers follow the design palette to achieve the desired result.

Edge Binding - Pechai - Carpets are bound with wool and silk on their sides for stability and longevity. The number of stitches is determined by the intricacy and density of the carpet

There is an inspection during the weaving process as well as once the carpet is taken off the loom. Firstly, the puttha (carpet back) is checked with the corresponding naksha to see if the pattern has been woven correctly.
The backing of the carpet also describes the quality and density of the carpet. This is done by counting tana and bana for quality (measuring the number of knots) with a napna (a small metal square covering 1 square inch of area). The reverse is also used to match the colour to the naksha & gucchis. The use of materials and the pile height is checked with a bhokna (a sharp device to spread the piles). Any loose knots or deviations are looked into.

There is an inspection during the weaving process as well as once the carpet is taken off the loom. Firstly, the puttha (carpet back) is checked with the corresponding naksha to see if the pattern has been woven correctly.
The backing of the carpet also describes the quality and density of the carpet. This is done by counting tana and bana for quality (measuring the number of knots) with a napna (a small metal square covering 1 square inch of area). The reverse is also used to match the colour to the naksha & gucchis. The use of materials and the pile height is checked with a bhokna (a sharp device to spread the piles). Any loose knots or deviations are looked into.

The carpets are approved by the designer for a final go-ahead.

The carpets are approved by the designer for a final go-ahead.

 

An extension of our craft

1

Manor & Mews

In 2015, Obeetee partnered with London’s leading bespoke furniture-maker David Salmon to create Manor and Mews. Based in Jaipur, the company is an amalgamation of Obeetee’s interest to expand into furniture making and David’s expression of a fresh look that counterbalances his traditional work. Their team of designers and cabinetmakers fuse fabric from Obeetee with the furniture, to create a starkly distinctive narrative. Products from the company are supplied around the world and domestically to companies like Fab India.

2

Panipat Factory

The Obeetee unit in Panipat, focuses primarily on sustainablity and products made of sustainable and natural materials such as cotton, wool, jute, hemp, linen, yarns made by recycling PET bottles. The product line also includes pillows made using undyed yarns.

 

When you buy an Obeetee Carpet, you buy a piece of history, and participate in a 500 year old tradition.